kellyngoesabroad:

I give you: Táin Bó Cúailnge
(as told by a Desmond Kenney mural on Nassau Street, 1974)
The wall follows Setanta—renamed Cúchulainn after his struggle with a guard dog (depicted on the far left)—and his epic life. The myth of Táin (or The Cattle Raid of Cooley) is considered a great Irish epic, and it involves some battles, some bulls, and of course, an untimely magical end.
You can read more about it here and here. 
Cúchulainn is a popular mythic hero in Ireland, similar to Hercules in Rome. His exploits are told and retold all over the place. The story in the Setanta Wall appears most notably in the stories of the Ulster Cycle, and in the Book of Leinster. One of my favorite details about this story in the Book of Leinster is the Latin (!) colophon: 

But I who have written this story, or rather this fable, give no credence to the various incidents related in it. For some things in it are the deceptions of demons, other poetic figments; some are probable, others improbable; while still others are intended for the delectation of foolish men

That is just so classic colophon. 
I’ve been mainly researching this myth—which I originally thought to be a Greek myth I couldn’t place—on Wikipedia, but I think it would be really interesting to work with it and other Irish legends in a deeper way. Reading (skimming) about Cúchulainn has reinvigorated my interest in Irish mythology. I hope NUI has a class on it! 
Zoom Info
kellyngoesabroad:

I give you: Táin Bó Cúailnge
(as told by a Desmond Kenney mural on Nassau Street, 1974)
The wall follows Setanta—renamed Cúchulainn after his struggle with a guard dog (depicted on the far left)—and his epic life. The myth of Táin (or The Cattle Raid of Cooley) is considered a great Irish epic, and it involves some battles, some bulls, and of course, an untimely magical end.
You can read more about it here and here. 
Cúchulainn is a popular mythic hero in Ireland, similar to Hercules in Rome. His exploits are told and retold all over the place. The story in the Setanta Wall appears most notably in the stories of the Ulster Cycle, and in the Book of Leinster. One of my favorite details about this story in the Book of Leinster is the Latin (!) colophon: 

But I who have written this story, or rather this fable, give no credence to the various incidents related in it. For some things in it are the deceptions of demons, other poetic figments; some are probable, others improbable; while still others are intended for the delectation of foolish men

That is just so classic colophon. 
I’ve been mainly researching this myth—which I originally thought to be a Greek myth I couldn’t place—on Wikipedia, but I think it would be really interesting to work with it and other Irish legends in a deeper way. Reading (skimming) about Cúchulainn has reinvigorated my interest in Irish mythology. I hope NUI has a class on it! 
Zoom Info
kellyngoesabroad:

I give you: Táin Bó Cúailnge
(as told by a Desmond Kenney mural on Nassau Street, 1974)
The wall follows Setanta—renamed Cúchulainn after his struggle with a guard dog (depicted on the far left)—and his epic life. The myth of Táin (or The Cattle Raid of Cooley) is considered a great Irish epic, and it involves some battles, some bulls, and of course, an untimely magical end.
You can read more about it here and here. 
Cúchulainn is a popular mythic hero in Ireland, similar to Hercules in Rome. His exploits are told and retold all over the place. The story in the Setanta Wall appears most notably in the stories of the Ulster Cycle, and in the Book of Leinster. One of my favorite details about this story in the Book of Leinster is the Latin (!) colophon: 

But I who have written this story, or rather this fable, give no credence to the various incidents related in it. For some things in it are the deceptions of demons, other poetic figments; some are probable, others improbable; while still others are intended for the delectation of foolish men

That is just so classic colophon. 
I’ve been mainly researching this myth—which I originally thought to be a Greek myth I couldn’t place—on Wikipedia, but I think it would be really interesting to work with it and other Irish legends in a deeper way. Reading (skimming) about Cúchulainn has reinvigorated my interest in Irish mythology. I hope NUI has a class on it! 
Zoom Info

kellyngoesabroad:

I give you: Táin Bó Cúailnge

(as told by a Desmond Kenney mural on Nassau Street, 1974)

The wall follows Setanta—renamed Cúchulainn after his struggle with a guard dog (depicted on the far left)—and his epic life. The myth of Táin (or The Cattle Raid of Cooley) is considered a great Irish epic, and it involves some battles, some bulls, and of course, an untimely magical end.

You can read more about it here and here. 

Cúchulainn is a popular mythic hero in Ireland, similar to Hercules in Rome. His exploits are told and retold all over the place. The story in the Setanta Wall appears most notably in the stories of the Ulster Cycle, and in the Book of Leinster. One of my favorite details about this story in the Book of Leinster is the Latin (!) colophon: 

But I who have written this story, or rather this fable, give no credence to the various incidents related in it. For some things in it are the deceptions of demons, other poetic figments; some are probable, others improbable; while still others are intended for the delectation of foolish men

That is just so classic colophon. 

I’ve been mainly researching this myth—which I originally thought to be a Greek myth I couldn’t place—on Wikipedia, but I think it would be really interesting to work with it and other Irish legends in a deeper way. Reading (skimming) about Cúchulainn has reinvigorated my interest in Irish mythology. I hope NUI has a class on it!